News

Former Wantirna Heights School sells to Oz Property Group

The Kingloch Parade deal is the largest for a General Residential Zone 1 property in Wantirna.

07 Aug 2019

Real Estate Source - Former Wantirna Heights School sells to Oz Property Group

Real Estate Source - Former Wantirna Heights School sells to Oz Property Group

 

The former Wantirna Heights School, in Melbourne’s east, has sold for $9.71 million.

Victoria’s Department of Education listed the 1.25 hectare site at 56 Kingloch Parade, Wantirna, in April.

It was deemed surplus to the government’s needs after closing in 2013.

In 2015, the department demolished all the school buildings before pushing through a rezoning which would allow for it to be replaced with housing.

Colliers International offered the property with a Development Plan Overlay, allowing an incoming owner more density than the General Residential gazetting the block currently has within the City of Knox planning scheme.

As well as residential developers, agents Hamish Burgess, Jun Lai and Joe Kairouz targeted aged care accommodation providers.

Ironically, schools were also the agents’ radar.

It is understood to be selling to Richmond-based Oz Property Group, whose other projects include a Balaclava townhouse development and 21-level Flemington apartment building, Equinox.

Oz Property Group also builds hotels.

The Kingloch Parade deal is the largest for a General Residential Zone 1 property in Wantirna – pipping the $9.7 million watermark set in 2015 when a 1.01 hectare parcel at 321 Wantirna Road (pictured, right) exchanged.

Wantirna is about 23 kilometres from the Melbourne CBD.

Read the full article here.

Oz Property Group snaps up the former Wantirna Heights primary school

Oz Property Group has snapped up a 12,540 m2 site in Wantirna, formerly the Wantirna Heights primary school.

27 Jul 2019

The Age - Oz Property Group snaps up Wantirna site

The Age - Oz Property Group snaps up Wantirna site

Raghav Goel’s Oz Property Group has snapped up the former Wantirna Heights primary school.

The developer, which has a solid workbook of suburban projects, is planning a $50 million medium-density project on the infill site.

Colliers International’s Hamish Burgess, Joe Kairouz and Jun Lai negotiated the deal.

The site at 56 Kinloch Parade is in a residential area between Mountain Highway and Boronia Road, close to Shultz Reserve, Knox Hospital and the Wantirna Mall.

Mr Burgess said the deal shows there is still a strong desire for infill suburban sites.

“We have seen strong enquiry this year as developers try to buy sites capable of delivering townhouses in the middle ring suburbs,” he said.Kingloch Wantirna

The former Wantirna Heights Primary School at 56 Kinloch Parade.

Read the full article here

Berwick Residences Update

All the latest on-site at Berwick.

21 Jul 2019

Berwick Residences Update

Berwick Residences Update

Berwick Residences is a unique town home development in an established precinct of Berwick. Comprising of large family homes, this development is currently under construction with completion expected in 2019.

July 2019

-Internal fit off in progress

-External works complete

-Landscaping commencing shortly

June 2019

-Brickwork completed

-External cladding completed

-Lock up completed

-Acoustic insulation completed

 

May 2019

-Framing complete

-Roofing underway

-Feature brickwork commenced

Donvale Residences Update

All the latest on-site at Donvale.

01 Jul 2019

Donvale Residences Update

Donvale Residences Update

Donvale Residences is an exclusive collection of townhomes with intelligent floor-plans and highly considered designs by CS-A.  It is currently under construction with anticipated completion in 2019.

August 2019

-Framing and bracing complete.
-Steel structure complete.
-External windows and doors installed.

July 2019

– Top floor framing complete

– Roof trusses and windows being installed

– Drainage generally complete

– Next steps will be to lock up all residences

 

June 2019

– Ground and first level framing and party walls complete

– Structural beams generally in place

– Drainage installation complete

May 2019

-Ground level masonry complete

-Final slabs and external staircases complete

-Perimeter retaining walls and waterproofing complete

-Drainage installation commenced

Drainage going in.

April 2019

-Underground slabs complete

-Formwork and pouring of car stacker pit walls complete

-Ground level masonry commenced

-Drainage Plan approved

Underground slabs completed.

Richmond townhouses built to look like warehouse conversion – Herald Sun

Converted warehouses hold a special place in Melbourne and are some of the city’s most sought-after properties.
Complete with sawtooth rooflines and exposed timber beams, the Oz Property project at 37-39 Shelley St, Richmond will include nine industrial-themed townhouses.

22 Mar 2019

New townhouses built to look like warehouse conversion - Herald Sun

New townhouses built to look like warehouse conversion - Herald Sun

Converted warehouses hold a special place in Melbourne’s inner suburbs and are some of the city’s most sought-after properties.

Now a developer is creating townhouses to look like them from scratch.

Complete with sawtooth rooflines and exposed timber beams, the Oz Property Group project at 37-39 Shelley St, Richmond will include nine industrial-themed townhouses.

 

The DKO Architecture design replaces a former printers warehouse on a corner block with three street frontages.

37-39 Shelley St, Richmond

The townhouses feature unique industrial styling inside as well.

An angular facade and industrial warehouse-style windows add street appeal, while triple-storey floorplans take advantage of clerestory windows to create light-filled interiors.

Inside it will take industrial chic a step further, swapping out traditional kitchen and bathroom joinery for wire mesh screens.

SLAB Architecture director Seada Linardi oversaw the interior design and said it wasn’t about mimicking a converted warehouse, it was about reimagining it.

37-39 Shelley St, Richmond

Clerestory windows are oriented to the southwest — the same way all warehouse windows were to make the best of soft light for workers.

“It’s more paying tribute than mimicry,” Ms Linardi said.

“A chance to do what’s already there, but our take on it.”

A shared central courtyard garden will act as a secondary access to the homes for owners, and some of the townhouses will also come with a rooftop terrace, while others have a more traditional terrace adjoining their living area.

37-39 Shelley St, Richmond

Few converted warehouses can offer a rooftop terrace.

Each townhouse will have its own street frontage and pitched ceilings soaring almost 3.5m overhead.

“We’ve added more height to create more light,” Ms Linardi said.

Walnut timber floors and Caesarstone benchtops also feature alongside a “flexi room” facing the courtyard garden entry. Buyers can opt for custom joinery that allows them to add a fold-up bed and fold-up desk to the room or to turn it into a space more particular to their needs.

37-39 Shelley St, Richmond

Even the bathrooms have shades of industrial heritage, with mesh screen cabinets

Shops, cafes, green spaces along the Yarra River and schools are all within walking distance. The CBD is a short commute away via Victoria Pde trams or North Richmond train station.

The townhouses are priced from $1.35-$1.5 million.

An official launch is set for later this month, but sales agent Georgina Mellick said the project had already had a strong response on social media.

A display suite will open in the existing printers workshop on site on Saturday, March 30.

Register interest

See full article Here

5 minutes with Seada Linardi, founder of SLAB

With every project, we start the same way, which is by looking at the context in which the project will sit: the site and history of the area. Our most recent project was Shelley St, Richmond by Oz Property. We started by spending time in the Richmond area to get an understanding of the lifestyle in the area.

07 Mar 2019

5 minutes with Seada Linardi, founder of SLAB

5 minutes with Seada Linardi, founder of SLAB

In her own words, SLAB‘s Seada Linardi describes her studio as a practice that is driven by an aesthetic approach to design. It’s young and youthful and she is “proud of the fresh thinking that the SLAB team demonstrates in each and every one of our projects.” Made up of a team of seven makes the boutique studio agile, allowing for a level of flexibility that can really focus on design.

How do you approach your projects? Do you have a set process?

With every project, we start the same way, which is by looking at the context in which the project will sit: the site and history of the area. Our most recent project was Shelley St, a townhouse project in Richmond by Oz Property. We started by spending time in the Richmond area to really get an understanding of the lifestyle in the area.

We workshop questions like “How is the history of the area relevant to the site and project?” and “How do we make sure we respect the area and what is already there, through our design?” Then we implement all our findings throughout the design. With Shelley St, for example, the design reflects the history of Richmond through aspects like the use of sawtooth roofs, brick façade and industrial aesthetic that Richmond is known for which extend into the interiors.

Shelley St.

Shelley St.

You founded SLAB in 2015, what have been some of the biggest learnings you’ve had throughout this process?

The biggest learning for me has been the business side of starting a practice: things like managing people and business cash flow. Design comes naturally to me; I’m not afraid of the design process. It’s the business management that was the learning curve. And we aren’t taught this side at university either, so you have to learn quickly.

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“The biggest challenge would be learning how to be a hustler. You have to constantly be hustling.” – Seada Linardi, SLAB
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What are some of the insights you can share being a female founder in a traditionally male-dominated (at least at director level) industry?

There’s some truth in the saying “fake it ‘til you make it”. Taking my own advice to be brave and confident and to not get intimidated by anyone!

You collaborate with your husband, Jesse Linardi, can you talk about that process and what it’s like?

We work together really well, and the process is a naturally easy one. We also have the same design aesthetic, which is probably how we come to work together and collaborate so often.

For things like Shelley St, we spent a lot of time over weekends in Richmond preparing for that project and getting to know the area. Because we’re married, it meant we could do that sort of thing easily and it doesn’t feel like work. The challenge is that because we live together, the work never leaves us.

Twin townhouses, a “hyper terrace” by DKO and SLAB was a collaborative project between Seada Linardi and her husband Jesse. Photo by Tom Blachford.

Twin townhouses, a “hyper terrace” by DKO and SLAB was a collaborative project between Seada Linardi and her husband. Photo by Tom Blachford.

Do you have any secret weapons of advice to share with young female architects starting out in the industry?

Be brave! It can be intimidating working in a firm. My advice would be to ask for help if you don’t understand something. It’s OK to absorb people’s experience and knowledge. Be true to yourself – don’t get stuck in a role that isn’t pushing you professionally and artistically.

 

What’s the biggest challenge you’ve faced?

The biggest challenge would be learning how to be a hustler. You have to constantly be hustling.

Also, when starting SLAB, it was all the unknowns. There were so many known unknowns when you start a business that you have to adapt and respond to, often learning as you go.

“My advice would be to ask for help if you don’t understand something. It’s OK to absorb people’s experience and knowledge.” – Seada Linardi, SLAB

What are you most proud of throughout your career?

I love that I am able to provide the SLAB team with opportunities to really own a project. This is something that’s not always available to young architects and designers in big firms, and I feel proud to be able to offer the opportunity to work on a project from start to finish.

How do you balance being a businesswoman and a parent?

Honestly, it’s really hard and really challenging. Everyone says that, but it’s certainly true. I have a one-year-old, Savanah, and you just have to make it work. She stays with my mother three days a week, and actually comes into the office with me two days a week, where she has become part of the SLAB team. Baby gates and all.

I love working, it’s a big part of my identity, and so while parenting and working are hard, becoming a parent is by far my biggest achievement and ultimately I’m grateful that I’m able to have the opportunity to do both.

See Full Article Here

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